The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “wealth

Why Do Rich Nations Have So Much Poverty?

Posted on January 16, 2019

This is a vital question.  Given capitalism’s track record of generating more wealth in the last century than all the rest of history put together, why, then, do the richest nations continue to have poor people, poor families, and an overall growth in poverty rates? The answers to such queries are necessarily complex.  The rise of precarious employment that offers little in the way of benefits of financial security is an important development, as is the loss of bargaining power of workers in general.  With the “going global” movement among corporations in recent decades, big business has lost its connection with local communities and concentrates more on wealth creation in markets than on healthy economies and satisfied workers.  The lack of affordable housing and alarming rise in…

Middle Class vs. Middle Class

Posted on October 4, 2018

It was a report that didn’t get enough coverage yet was fantastic in scope. For the first time in human history, slightly over half of the world’s population is identified as either middle class or richer – over 3.5 billion people.  That leaves a slightly smaller number as vulnerable or poor, but, still, the rapid advancement of the financial status of half the globe serves as a remarkable moment in time. Released last month (September 2018) by the Brookings Institute, it serves as a reminder that much is happening in our world that is good and angles towards hope.  Perhaps more interesting is the speed by which it is all transpiring.  One billion people are being added to the middle class every seven years.…

A Decade of Doubt

Posted on September 21, 2018

Confusion.  Confusion everywhere.  Confusion in the House itself and in Question Period.  Confusion in caucus meetings.  Confusion in the various committees.  Confusion at events.  Confusion when socializing with other MPs.  Confusion in calls home to spouses and children.  Confusion from the top leadership levels to the lowliest backbencher. Confusion among economists. Confusion among bureaucrats. Confusion in the media and among citizens.  Again, confusion everywhere. A decade ago I was sitting in Parliament – one of slightly over 300 MPs trying to figure out what just hit us.  Had the American stock market crashed?  Was Wall Street doing anything?  What about Canadian securities?  Is this going global or confined to America? It didn’t take long to understand that the Great Recession of 2008 was upon us and, like…

Revolution or Evolution: The Only Two Choices Left

Posted on September 11, 2018

We have reached the stage where we actually have no idea of what is going to happen.  Here’s a list of questions to get us in the mood for a more serious kind of discussion.  Some are cheeky, but they need to be asked regardless. Is free trade ever going to be as great as past leaders and economists told us it would be? Will the Trump Doctrine, or lack of it, blow up the rest of the world? Can Canada keep its delicate federalism in place when the inevitable threats of separation arise? Will good paying jobs ever come back? Do the terms “post-democracy” or “post-capitalist” mean that both of those systems are about to be relegated to the history books? Are citizens…

Humanity is About the Workers, Not the Work

Posted on September 3, 2018

With Labour Day upon us, it might be a good time to ask a simple question: “What about the workers?” Seriously.  We’ve been talking about everything from what industry requires for the better part of two decades and workers are meant to just deal with any changes that have been implemented – most often without their input.  We demand citizen participation In our politics but tolerate an economy that sees less labour input, or even rights, each successive year. A good example of this the World Economic Forum’s recent report, published by its Council of Work, Gender and Education.  Its co-chair, Stephane Kasriel, posted last December what he believed to be the four predictions on the future of work, based largely upon the activities…

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