The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “poverty

A Neat Symbol of Ingestion

Posted on February 27, 2018

The contrast was stark – and telling. En route back to Canada following a trip to South Sudan, our team was on a layover at Frankfurt. Eager for news – any news – I purchased a Time magazine, poring over its pages to see if anything significant had transpired while we were disconnected from the broader world. And there they were, two adjacent stories which together spelled out so much of what is going wrong and right with the modern world. Molly Ball’s compelling narrative concerning President Trump’s visit to Davos for the annual Global Economic Forum revealed just how much has changed in the past year. Most present had grown more at ease regarding Trump’s influence. One year ago, they were collectively on…

The Journey to “Deeply Disturbed”

Posted on February 23, 2018

Richard Florida is well-known as an American urban theorist, focusing much of his writing on social and economic theory.  He is currently a professor and head of the Martin Prosperity Institute and the University of Toronto.  His book Rise of the Creative Class (2002) and two follow-up volumes maintained that the creative class in cities were in the process of ushering in a new era of urban renewal and prosperity. Events of the last decade, however, and a wide array of new research has revealed some troubling new realities – concerns he writes about in his new book, The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class—and What We Can Do About It.  There are some…

For 2018, Boring is Better

Posted on December 26, 2017

Journalists can be forgiven for growing jaded over time. Covering politics can prove to be a deep struggle of getting facts from those seeking to shelter them. More often than not journalists know they are being played. “The media are less a window on reality, than a stage on which officials perform self-scripted, self-serving functions,” wrote Thomas Sowell, and there’s a strong element of truth in it. Given what’s going on in places like America, Venezuela, Russia, Britain, Spain and China, Canadian news at times can seem outright boring. Yet it says something about this country – our politics, our citizenry, our economy, our institutions. Closing out 2017, we as Canadians understand that our pliability is a blessing. There are numerous challenges existing at…

Inequality in the Fast Lane

Posted on December 14, 2017

In the midst of all the election hubbub following the stunning Democratic Senate win in Alabama, one Republican congressman used the occasion to call on the Republican Party to dump Steve Bannon, one of the early architects of Trump’s presidency. Congressman Peter King is worried over where his own party is headed in recent weeks and although his speaking out against Bannon raised a lot of eyebrows, it was something he said only a couple of weeks earlier that carries much more significance. While the Republican tax cut plan was heralded by some in Washington, King was flummoxed by the nonsensical hurry to get it passed when it was, in fact, the deepest cut in corporate taxes seen in decades. “You’re rewriting a tax…

The World’s Food Supply is at Risk

Posted on October 16, 2017

It happens on the same day every year and on each occasion the world falls farther behind. Today, October 16th, is World Food Day, whose purpose is to mobilize global awareness and citizen action for those suffering from hunger around the world. We occasionally hear that the battle against hunger is getting better in developing nations, but that is only partially true. And in developed countries like Canada? Well, that’s another story. Food Secure Canada estimates that almost 2.5 million Canadians live without secure access to food. Of the 850,000 Canadians that visit food banks each month, one-third are kids. Between 20-25% of American lives are mired in the same situation. Countries with lower rates of child hunger than the United States include Vietnam…

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