The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “poverty

Want to Defeat Poverty? Take Time.

Posted on October 19, 2016

ASKED BACK IN 2012 WHY POVERTY WAS SO ENTRENCHED in affluent societies around the world, President Barack Obama provided an answer that, while infuriating some social activists, actually gave hope to others. He simply said that it was time to apply “two-generation solutions.” He meant developing initiatives that affected both parents and their children as opposed to isolated programs that helped one but not the other. And such policies would take time to develop to be effective, he believed. We don’t really want to hear this because those enduring grinding poverty require quick alleviation of their distressing circumstances. We want to believe that through good-hearted actions that we create paths to escape from poverty’s hold. I wrote a blog post last week concerning how…

Poverty’s Problem is Division, Not Addition

Posted on October 13, 2016

IN ITS OWN WAY, THE LONDON FOOD BANK’S fall food drive turned out to be a remarkable initiative. With donations up significantly over last year’s effort, it was tempting to think that citizens were in a more generous mood than last year. It’s true, they were, but the real story was what it was that put them in such a mood. While totals donated to food drives tend to decline over the years, yearly givings go up as citizens increasingly take advantage of dropping off their donations at grocery stores across the city. Food drives often have to compete with other interests when it comes to capturing media attention, but this Thanksgiving it was these other avenues that created the context for a terrific…

Canada’s Kind of World

Posted on August 17, 2016

PERHAPS THE GREATEST TEMPTATION IN THE WORLD of government is the politics of the urgent, and in a world of bad news the pressure to “do something” becomes endless. The recent incident in Strathroy, Ontario, of a man suspected of plotting a terrorist attack only provides further fodder for those concerned over the presently precarious state of the world. Turkey, Syria, France, mass shootings, individual acts of madness – all of these occurrences are pressing on the Canadian government at once, with pundits endlessly reminding us that something has to be done before our planet blows up. But there is another world out there – a global place of collaboration and effectiveness that continues to get glossed over in favour of front page headlines.…

Is It Really That Bad?

Posted on May 5, 2016

OKAY, WE UNDERSTAND WHY SO MANY AMERICANS feel as if the world is getting worse, especially following Donald Trump’s significant triumph in this week’s Indiana primary. Millions are now really worried that the ascendancy of “The Donald” is a sure sign that everything is in decline. But hold on. America’s difficulties right now aren’t necessarily a harbinger for the rest of the world, or even for itself. Consider some other signs. These past few decades have seen a war on death itself. Since 1990, those dying from AIDS have declined by 25%, by tuberculosis, child and maternal death by 50%, and by measles 71%. As a result, global life expectancy since 1950 has increased from 47 to 70 years. Furthermore, despite the occasional terrorist…

The Shelter of Each Other

Posted on March 3, 2016

THIS CONUNDRUM OF HOMELESSNESS IN CANADA has become an exquisitely painful exercise. Over a number of decades we watched from a distance as it first emerged in our larger cities, then became something of an embarrassment to civic, provincial, and federal leaders. It is a part of the Canadian landscape that we understand doesn’t match our worldwide appeal or our domestic ideals. At crucial moments during that journey (an excruciating trek for those who are actually homeless) the subtle compromise was reached that it was a problem that needed to be managed as opposed to solved – a subtle admission that the distance between our compassionate ideals and our desire for an affluent life was unbridgeable. For those living without a secure place for…

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