The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “personal growth

The Secret Nook – Chapter 11 (Under the Sun)

Posted on October 10, 2018

Perhaps “lost” wasn’t the right word.  More than anything, she felt hopeless.  On a whim based on a recurring dream, Meadow had taken time off from work, borrowed her boss’s truck, driven back into her childhood, and ended up in a place that seemed to have no open doors. Lying in her bed and waiting for the sun’s morning rays to warm her, she thought of just how much her life had followed this pattern.  She had wanted to go back to college and take business courses, but didn’t have the money. Two failed romantic relationships had done little to build her confidence.  She had buried her talent.  And now she had returned back home in an effort to uncover some secret from her past…

Summer Reflections – Half of Life, Half of Death

Posted on July 17, 2018

Ronald Rotheiser issues a challenge in his Forgotten Among the Lilies, and it’s worth taking up as a summer test.  Prompting us to have a good look in the mirror, he says: “Scrutinize and examine, look for signs of ageing, but spend that time looking into your eyes.  What do they reveal?  Are they tired, unenthusiastic, cynical, lifeless, lacking in sparkle, hardened?  . . . Is there any fire there?  Does passion still burn?  Are they weary of experiencing, incapable of being surprised?  Is there still a young child buried somewhere behind them?” It used to be that such insights were directed to those reaching senior years, but not anymore. There’s been too much research telling us that depression, loneliness, mental illness and a quiet desperation…

Summer Reflections – Don’t Let Them Die

Posted on July 10, 2018

In Victor Hugo’s tale Notre-Dame de Paris,composed in the 15thcentury, the printing press had just been developed and the Archdeacon of the great cathedral, Claude Frollo, stands outside and holds his first printed book in his hands.  Its quality and potential both fascinate and trouble him.  He looks from the pages of the book up to the spires of the great cathedral and says, “This will kill that.” He wasn’t correct, of course, but the printed word challenged the church and most other 15-century institutions in remarkable ways.  Yet that new technology didn’t so much kill God as take the concept of a higher being public and served to democratize the church along paths no one could have predicted. In retelling Hugo’s story of…

The Christmas Story Was Written For the Sorrowful

Posted on December 16, 2017

We go about wishing each other happy holidays and a merry Christmas, but sometimes the holiday season can be cruel. For some people, it’s a reminder of ones we deeply loved who are no longer with us. The holidays will arrive without them this year, and it’s likely the coming weeks will feel more like a survival course than a season of celebration. As London follows its seasonal narrative of gift-shopping, celebrations, lights, music, family gatherings, sumptuous dinners and endless snacks, among us will be many moving like shadows through it all, struggling in their sense of loss yet attempting to live up to the expectations of others. Along with the joy we share together, any good city recognizes the pain of others. The…

Christmas Prep – Memories

Posted on December 9, 2016

JOHN GLENN DIED YESTERDAY AT THE AGE OF 95. Like millions of young boys, he was a hero to me as the first astronaut to orbit the earth in 1962. Having never been accomplished in history, it was a big deal – not just to me but to an entire generation that found hope and fascination in the future. As soon as it was announced that he had died I tuned into CNN at the top of the hour – but nothing. I flipped over to CBC television and then CTV. It was the top story on both Canadian networks. CNN spent almost 15 minutes on news of Donald Trump before finally getting to the John Glenn story. How sad, I thought to myself,…

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