The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “Ontario

Voices But No Voice

Posted on October 7, 2018

It wasn’t all that long ago when people believed the world was coming together, forming one community premised on human rights, equality, self-determination and the right of every voice to be heard. Helping all that along were technological advancements – economical transportation, the internet, cellphones and social media. But something happened along the way, to the point where it seems most now believe the world is coming apart and the tech tools have just as much alienated us from one another as they have helped us understand one another better. We no longer know what to make of our world. With more money than ever in its history, more exposure to other cultures and ideas, and global communications now possible in a millisecond, we…

Why Can’t Ontario Feed Itself?

Posted on March 9, 2018

It’s a term that’s becoming an increasing part of our everyday language: food poverty. It’s about those individuals and families who suffer food insecurity every day and have to make difficult and painstaking choices on what they have to give up to feed those they care for. Over 4,000,000 fit into this category, including 1,500,000 children. It’s an unsuitable situation in any land and a toleration of injustice to put it plainly. Food poverty has broken up families, led to emotional and mental breakdowns, poor health, poor school grades, chronic health conditions, and a lack of participation in normal social interactions. And don’t use food banks as a measure of how great the problem is because those suffering food insecurity are far greater than…

For Libraries, It’s Their Time

Posted on April 21, 2015

  LOOKING BACK ON A LIFE THAT HAD FAR more twists and turns than most of us could endure, Lemony Snicket considered one aspect of his journey that provided him solace: “A good library will never be too neat, or too dusty, because somebody will always be in it, taking books off the shelves and staying up reading them.” To that list could be added the extra dimensions of viewing, listening, dialogue, and social media. It’s likely we know this already, yet in some of the most significant happenings of modern life – many of them tragic in nature – libraries having taken on the roles of consolers, citizen guardians, event educators, and, in some senses, emergency agencies. Some examples. Consider how Ferguson, Missouri’s,…

Making History Without Knowing It

Posted on December 9, 2014

ROSA PARKS ADMITTED THAT SHE WAS TIRED on that particular morning as she shuffled off to the bus stop and began a journey that was about to form part of the seminal beginning of the civil rights movement. As procedure demanded, she entered the front of the bus, paid for her ticket, then exited to the outside and re-entered through the back door to the black section. Realizing the white section was filled, the bus driver ordered Ms. Parks to give up her seat to a white passenger. We all know what happened next and the movement her refusal helped to launch. Her own simple account of that day is still inspiring: “I had no idea history was being made. I was just tired of…

Showing Up

Posted on October 7, 2014

Last Saturday night I gave a speech, in which I endorsed Matt Brown’s candidacy for mayor of London, Ontario.  Later, a number of people asked if they could acquire a copy.  I had spoken spontaneously and had no written record, so I informed them that I would write down what I could recall of the speech and put it in my blog.  Below is the text of that speech.  Following all the research undertaken in recent weeks on the need for mayors with a new outlook on citizenship, I am only too happy to vote for Matt and the respect for the average citizen which I believe he will bring to politics.   I’m at this rally tonight for Matt Brown because I’m tired.…

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