The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “middle class

The G7’s Troubles Started Long Before Trump

Posted on June 12, 2018

It was hardly much ado about nothing.  In fact, there’s been nothing like it in decades.  Donald Trump’s erratic utterances before, during and following the recent G7 meetings effectively kept the world attentive and coming unglued at the same time.  The irony of the American president wanting a chair at the table for the Soviet Union while one of his key advisors called for a special seat in hell for Justin Trudeau wasn’t missed by anyone. The attempt by the other G7 leaders to keep everything from unravelling was commendable, but there remained this abiding sense that the global order which has prevailed over much of the world since World War Two was in the process of unravelling. Something is wrong and, in many…

Middle-Out

Posted on February 25, 2016

“AMERICA’S PREMIER SELF-LOATHING PLUTOCRAT“ – no kidding, that’s what they call Nick Hanauer. He’s been in these blog posts before, where we spoke of his criticizing his peers for robbing the wealth of the United States instead of investing in productivity. He’s now at it again, only this time championing a $15 minimum wage south of the border. Again, his peers and the corporate elite are irate with his position, and small business owners aren’t wild about it either, but his rationale, and the way he publicizes it, is carrying some momentum. In fact, the way he sees it, it’s not the labour leader or minimum wage employee who’s the best face of the effort, but his own. His rationale? “A guy like me…

Two-Fold Shame

Posted on February 3, 2015

IT CAUGHT A LARGE NUMBER OF AMERICANS off-guard, but there it was, on record, and an abrupt turnaround from a few years earlier. Although Mitt Romney dropped out of the race to be the Republican presidential nominee last week, he had nevertheless raised eyebrows when claiming that his interest in entering the contest was based on a deep desire to address poverty and income inequality. A subject that barely reached the surface in his last presidential run against Obama, the plight of the marginalized was now front and centre. Moreover, he announced his concern for another group as well. “It’s a tragedy, a human tragedy, that the middle class in this country by and large doesn’t believe that the future will be better than the…

No Need For Persuasion

Posted on January 6, 2015

JUST WHEN YOU THINK NATIONAL POLITICS appears firmly cemented into the realm of hyper-partisan and unimaginative policies comes along a candidate who causes us to think different. Sometimes the effect of such a presence is profound, as I discovered over the holidays reading U. S. Senator Elizabeth Warren’s gritty, A Fighting Chance. The New York Times describes the book as, “a potent mix of memoir and policy,” as indeed it is. Her presence in the political dimension is energizing enough to spend more than one post on her influence. She’s rapidly becoming the most captivating political personality in years. Yes, Warren is a Democrat, and, yes, she comes from the progressive spectrum. But she is best described as a populist, as seen in the massive movement of middle-class…

Magpie Economics

Posted on April 1, 2014

LEADING ECONOMICS WRITER FOR THE Guardian newspaper, Aditya Chakrabortty, likes to talk about “magpie economics” – the kind of financial and economic discipline that takes into account, history, politics, philosophy, and social good.  His problem has become that he has run out of examples.  One of his sober conclusions puts it this way: How do elites remain in charge? If the tale of the economists is any guide, by clearing out the opposition and then blocking their ears to reality. The result is the one we’re all paying for.” And indeed we are paying.  There is justification in placing blame on the corporate giants, the meddling CEOs, unregulated globalization, and the financial barons, but at some point we have to come to terms with the…

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