The Parallel Parliament

by Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “hunger

One More Time, With Meaning

Posted on October 4, 2013

Today it is.  The London Food Bank launches its 25th annual Thanksgiving Food Drive, running from today, October 4th right through to Thanksgiving Monday, October 14th.  Every year, some in the media ask us to do something new and different to draw attention to the challenge we face as a food bank.  We always take a pass on that challenge because in our view 3600 families a month coming to us directly for assistance is not only a significant news story but a deep challenge to our community as well. And we’re not alone in that challenge.  Consider this: 412,998 individuals accessed Ontario food banks in March 2012 38.7% of food bank users, or 159,918 individuals, were children (11,737 more children than in March…

Hunger and Waste

Posted on October 10, 2012

The following is my recently published article in the Huffington Post. Across Canada hundreds of food banks sent out special appeals over the Thanksgiving season asking people to donate generously. They had clear reason for doing so. Most food banks are facing record demand, as a deep recession that has supposedly ended still leaves its impact all over the country. The London Food Bank, which I co-direct, has seen a 19% increase over this time last year – the majority of that increased demand made up of people who only two years ago were working. Last August saw our highest monthly demand ever in our 25-year history and our highest daily record was only two weeks ago. While many still claim that food banks…

Haughty and Hungry

Posted on May 22, 2012

There was a time, not all that many years ago when Canada was a deeply respected world player, that the United Nations was the venue through which we applied our foreign policy. Unlike our neighbours to the south, who exhibited a certain scepticism toward the international organization, Canada would only sanction international actions once cleared through the Security Council. It was a pattern practiced by every prime minister, regardless of the party in power. There were advantages to this approach. Such constraint taught us the effective nuances of diplomacy and foreign service and kept us from striking out unilaterally in ways that could disturb fragile peace networks around the world. Certain vestiges of that approach remain, but our careful diplomacy has now been overrun…

Hunger Games – Global Reach

Posted on April 5, 2012

Foresight, a think-tank established to predict future crises, spent most of last year calling for “urgent action” to prevent food shortages worldwide. Hardly anyone in Canada noticed, but at the United Nations, the World Food Program, and other international institutions it set the alarm bells ringing. Following 18 months of research, Foresight concluded that even a modest rise in food prices would force “hundreds of millions” of people into hunger. Worse still, such turbulence for food commodities would inevitably result in mass migrations, spark civil unrest, and could lead to the rich countries turning on the poorer nations in order to protect their food supplies for their wealthy citizens. We’ve heard about such warning for a long time – decades maybe – but they…

Hunger Games – No Way Out

Posted on April 4, 2012

Budgets are infernal things and in times of economic hardship can either rescue a troubled economy or prolong it. And in a world where governments ever have an eye toward the next election and big business runs on quarterly projections, budgets inevitably have a particular audience in mind to improve their ratings and their fortunes, regardless of long-term consequences. With the case of the Finance Minister’s budget announcement it’s clear he wasn’t speaking to Canada’s less-fortunate, other than to encourage them to keep a stiff upper lip – the hunger games will continue. For whatever reason, governments continue to justify cuts to the poor or marginalized under the rubric that we all have sacrifices to make if we hope to balance the books. The…

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