The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “family

“Summer Reflections – Disconnecting to Connect”

Posted on July 8, 2018

So here are some details, just to prepare you for summer, as recounted by author Michael Harris. In 2012, we were asking Google questions over a trillion times a year.  Six years later that number has almost doubled.  At the same time, we were “liking” something on Facebook 4.5 billion times a day.  We were also uploading to You Tube some 100 hours of video for every minute of real-time. Collectively, we also posted over 600 photos on Instagram every second. In just the last few years, our use of the Internet has exploded 565 per cent.  Such usage dwarfs the revolutions brought about by the printing press, maps, and the scientific discoveries of earlier ages. Kaiser Foundation found that kids eight-to-eighteen years old were…

The Growing Darkness

Posted on March 11, 2018

It’s a life of episodes — perhaps a fitting way of describing life with dementia or Alzheimer’s. It’s one thing to lose your health, your job or a loved one, but what happens when you lose yourself? Is there an individual or family tragedy any greater? And yet it’s lived out every day by thousands of Londoners and most of us will never know about it until signs emerge somewhere within our intimate circle. In London some 9,000 families wear themselves out in silence at an agony that can rip one’s insides out. Across Canada, almost half a million citizens suffer from dementia and Alzheimer’s. Within 15 years that number will reach one million. Globally, 100 million struggle with the disease — a number that will reach 300…

Century Thoughts

Posted on December 16, 2016

MEMORIES OF HIM DROP FROM THE SKIES like snowflakes lightly touching the ground. On December 15th, 1916, a rather frail baby was born in a home in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan – an arrival that, in part at least, led to my own journey. Lloyd Durward Pearson was my father, and that obscure birth 100 years ago today launched him into an era of seismic happenings. He was born in the middle of the First World War (1914–1918), and looking back on it now I realize that he never really got the chance to enjoy a comfortable youth. Like millions of his generation, he entered adolescence on the heels of a world conflict that cost 17 million lives and a further 20 million wounded only to face…

Mothers: The Gift of Endurance

Posted on May 8, 2016

With Mom in Calgary (1960) MY MOTHER WOULD HAVE BEEN 98 THIS YEAR.  Losing her some 35 years ago was difficult; today she is my constant companion. Meeting my father when he was on leave in Edinburgh, Scotland, during World War Two introduced her to a future she could never have predicted. She became a Scottish war bride in 1944 by marrying her Canadian soldier. There was lots of that in those days, and the hotels were so full that they had to spend their summer wedding night in a cow pasture. It was likely to be her last moment of real peace before the madness of war and personal tumult invaded her world. Six months later she received a telegram from the War Department,…

A Noble Share

Posted on December 26, 2015

“DO YOU FEEL OLD, POP POP?” my granddaughter asked, knowing that my 65th birthday was coming today, December 26th. Well, Annie, here’s my answer. I sure look older. I can still run, jump, and play, but not like I used to. Every time I put on my glasses to read I’m reminded of how many years have passed. And yet I now have more friends in my library than back then, and I have relationships with each of them. Yes, I require glasses to read them, but with the wisdom that comes with years I now understand them better than I did when clear-eyed. They are my books, and should I go blind tomorrow I will be no poorer, for I can recite some…

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