The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “employment

The Third Place (Chapter 16) – A Deeper Acceptance

Posted on August 19, 2018

The national attention brought to the Third Place by the Home Comfort feature was obviously good for business, especially after such a positive review, but its popularity was already great regardless. Still, we accommodated the heavier crowds as best we could. Yet something had altered in how people saw the establishment.  The novelty of gaining national and international attention at a time when our mid-sized city was down on its luck provided the community a boost, a sense of hope despite the difficult economic times.  Even local media picked up on the notoriety, with some even requesting Dad to do an interview.  As usual, he turned down most of these requests and chose to concentrate instead on working with his customers. For years, younger generations had…

“Summer Reflections – Days of Rebellion”

Posted on July 13, 2018

Samuel Taylor Coleridge noted that “summer has set in with its usual severity.”  But seriously, most of us welcome these days of escape from the harsh winter months.  We explore the chance to unwind, to read, swim, relax or enjoy summer activities. But there has been plenty of research released in recent years that reveals how ambivalent, even hostile, many workplaces are about the warm months.  Why?  Because they supposedly make us lazy and the capitalistic mind views that as a rival to work productivity.  We aren’t surprised to learn that on inclement days we are more hesitant to head outside, choosing instead to stay at our desk or tasks.  One Japanese study discovered that businesses could get 30-minutes of extra toil from workers…

If You Want to Fix Poverty, Fix the Economy

Posted on April 5, 2018

This is from a post I wrote a few years ago (October 2015) and it still seems as relevant today.  We’re still not making the choices necessary to attain serious poverty reduction.   He awoke from a deep slumber a couple of weeks ago to the sound of phone ringing incessantly, but when he answered he didn’t mind. Angus Deaton was being informed by someone on the other end of the phone that he was being awarded the Nobel Prize for Economic Science. Interestingly, it was how he shed new light on persistent poverty that earned him the credit. Or as the Nobel committee put it: “To design economic policy that promotes welfare and reduces poverty, we must first understand individual consumption choices. Angus…

Middle-Out

Posted on February 25, 2016

“AMERICA’S PREMIER SELF-LOATHING PLUTOCRAT“ – no kidding, that’s what they call Nick Hanauer. He’s been in these blog posts before, where we spoke of his criticizing his peers for robbing the wealth of the United States instead of investing in productivity. He’s now at it again, only this time championing a $15 minimum wage south of the border. Again, his peers and the corporate elite are irate with his position, and small business owners aren’t wild about it either, but his rationale, and the way he publicizes it, is carrying some momentum. In fact, the way he sees it, it’s not the labour leader or minimum wage employee who’s the best face of the effort, but his own. His rationale? “A guy like me…

Needing More Than Good Wages

Posted on June 25, 2015

FOR TWO DECADES THE SUBJECT OF JOBS, or the lack of them, has come to dominate more and more of the public and political space. The conversation runs the range from no jobs, minimum wage jobs, to intriguing new discussions on living wage opportunities. The gold standard that everyone would prefer is employment with good wages – a depleting reality at present. There has been some movement on the issue, perhaps the most notable being Walmart’s raising wages for some of its lowest-paid employees in the U.S. It has been surmised that the retail giant made the move following the release of the book, The Good Jobs, by MIT professor Zeynep Ton 18 months ago. But rather than being encouraged by such initiatives taken…

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