The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “economy

More Vulnerable Than We Think

Posted on January 18, 2019

Their stories weren’t of the tragic kind, but in listening to some of the 800,000 American government workers who have been living without a wage during the country’s longest government shutdown, one couldn’t help but feel for them.  They had done nothing to deserve such treatment, yet they are losing mortgages, selling their cars, prematurely dipping into their retirement savings, and, in some painful images, taking their kids out of college.  If there is a trait of tragedy about the entire thing, it is to be found in the partisan mess that is American politics at the moment and how political leaders have become so calloused to the plight of millions – even if those workers are the ones actually keeping the government going instead of…

Some Wicked This Way Comes

Posted on September 27, 2018

Economist Jim Rickards was one of the very few who predicted 2008’s Great Recession and no one really listened.  Now he’s at it again, claiming that the financial leaders haven’t learned from that last great debacle and that something far worse is now coming.  On this occasion, however, he has some powerful support.  Warren Buffett, George Soros, the Economist, Financial Times, and even the Nasdaq’s own in-house publication have agreed and warned it is time to prepare.  It’s a bit enervating to hear them talk since they view it as the next bump in the road of capitalism’s wild ride, while in reality it will leave millions of families devastated.  We should be listening. This delicate balance between capitalism and democracy turned out to…

Humanity is About the Workers, Not the Work

Posted on September 3, 2018

With Labour Day upon us, it might be a good time to ask a simple question: “What about the workers?” Seriously.  We’ve been talking about everything from what industry requires for the better part of two decades and workers are meant to just deal with any changes that have been implemented – most often without their input.  We demand citizen participation In our politics but tolerate an economy that sees less labour input, or even rights, each successive year. A good example of this the World Economic Forum’s recent report, published by its Council of Work, Gender and Education.  Its co-chair, Stephane Kasriel, posted last December what he believed to be the four predictions on the future of work, based largely upon the activities…

Padlocking the Revolving Door

Posted on August 30, 2018

A couple of days ago, in a National Newswatch piece, I broached a sincere question: Can we actually afford the kind of capitalism we have at present?  There were lots of interesting responses, usually focusing on America as the epi-centre of economic dysfunction. So, it was surprising to read Franklin Foer’s column in the Atlantic yesterday talking about Senator Elizabeth Warren’s take on modern capitalism.  We’ve covered the feisty American senator (Ted Kennedy’s replacement) in previous posts, but with her courageous willingness to talk about the global financial order and its devastating affects worldwide, Warren is merely voicing what millions are thinking. She begins by acknowledging that her Democratic party’s recent flirtation with socialism is infusing a new generation of voters into the process, and…

Capitalism in the Crosshairs

Posted on August 28, 2018

In the midst of what was perhaps Donald Trump’s worst week of his presidency emerged a Gallup poll whose findings got lost in all the political intrigue.  To quote the poll directly: “The major change among Democrats has been a less upbeat attitude toward capitalism, dropping to 47 percent positive this year — lower than in any of the three previous measures.  In contrast, 57 percent of Democrats have a positive view of socialism.” This is significant when you think about it.  It’s the first time in over a decade that the favourable view of Democrats concerning capitalism has dipped below 50 percent – lower even than the pessimism that followed the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis and Wall Street bailouts. To emphasize…

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