The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “economy

Humanity is About the Workers, Not the Work

Posted on September 3, 2018

With Labour Day upon us, it might be a good time to ask a simple question: “What about the workers?” Seriously.  We’ve been talking about everything from what industry requires for the better part of two decades and workers are meant to just deal with any changes that have been implemented – most often without their input.  We demand citizen participation In our politics but tolerate an economy that sees less labour input, or even rights, each successive year. A good example of this the World Economic Forum’s recent report, published by its Council of Work, Gender and Education.  Its co-chair, Stephane Kasriel, posted last December what he believed to be the four predictions on the future of work, based largely upon the activities…

Padlocking the Revolving Door

Posted on August 30, 2018

A couple of days ago, in a National Newswatch piece, I broached a sincere question: Can we actually afford the kind of capitalism we have at present?  There were lots of interesting responses, usually focusing on America as the epi-centre of economic dysfunction. So, it was surprising to read Franklin Foer’s column in the Atlantic yesterday talking about Senator Elizabeth Warren’s take on modern capitalism.  We’ve covered the feisty American senator (Ted Kennedy’s replacement) in previous posts, but with her courageous willingness to talk about the global financial order and its devastating affects worldwide, Warren is merely voicing what millions are thinking. She begins by acknowledging that her Democratic party’s recent flirtation with socialism is infusing a new generation of voters into the process, and…

Capitalism in the Crosshairs

Posted on August 28, 2018

In the midst of what was perhaps Donald Trump’s worst week of his presidency emerged a Gallup poll whose findings got lost in all the political intrigue.  To quote the poll directly: “The major change among Democrats has been a less upbeat attitude toward capitalism, dropping to 47 percent positive this year — lower than in any of the three previous measures.  In contrast, 57 percent of Democrats have a positive view of socialism.” This is significant when you think about it.  It’s the first time in over a decade that the favourable view of Democrats concerning capitalism has dipped below 50 percent – lower even than the pessimism that followed the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis and Wall Street bailouts. To emphasize…

The G7’s Troubles Started Long Before Trump

Posted on June 12, 2018

It was hardly much ado about nothing.  In fact, there’s been nothing like it in decades.  Donald Trump’s erratic utterances before, during and following the recent G7 meetings effectively kept the world attentive and coming unglued at the same time.  The irony of the American president wanting a chair at the table for the Soviet Union while one of his key advisors called for a special seat in hell for Justin Trudeau wasn’t missed by anyone. The attempt by the other G7 leaders to keep everything from unravelling was commendable, but there remained this abiding sense that the global order which has prevailed over much of the world since World War Two was in the process of unravelling. Something is wrong and, in many…

And So It Goes

Posted on May 10, 2018

Over the period of two years, after Canadian Mark Carney left his post as the head of the Bank of Canada to take on the prestigious role as Bank of England governor, it was like he was jumping from the frying pan into the fire. The global economy continued on its roller coaster journey at the same time that global wealth was nesting comfortably within the management of less than 1 per cent of the population. Carney was deemed a typical mild-mannered Canadian who would bring a sense of stability. So when he was asked to speak at England’s prestigious Guild Hall to the country’s elites no one was expecting anything out of the ordinary.. They should have been better prepared. He surprised everyone…

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