The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “community

Setting Folks a-Twitter

Posted on February 10, 2016

TWITTER IS FEELING THE PAIN, and it’s not a conclusion based on mere conjecture. Three years ago everyone seemed to be migrating in its direction – the BIG THING. For a time it was the creative public space that its founders designed it to be and people found a voice for their opinions and ideas. Yesterday we learned that the company has fallen from a worth of $40 billion (US) to $10 billion (US), in just three years. Twitter wasn’t just a good platform for communicating; it attracted investors, too. But that’s changing, as both money and opinions seem to be moving off in other directions. In dedicated fashion Twitter is trying to reverse the slide, with its main response being shifting tweets from…

Election 2015 and the One-Percent

Posted on October 8, 2015

IT WAS ONLY A WEEK AGO THAT PUNDITS were arguing if “change” was really a factor in the campaign. Things weren’t shaking up much and parties appeared to be in a kind of holding pattern. Not anymore. Movement is showing up in the polling numbers and a sense of new life is emerging in this long campaign season. Voter sentiment is getting aroused and now media coverage is talking about change in its stories. Will it be enough to set us in a new direction as a country? If you asked someone like American activist Ralph Nader you might be encouraged by his answer. Honoured by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential Americans of the 20th Century, Nader thinks that citizens really…

Election 2015: Politicians Should Understand Precarious Work

Posted on October 1, 2015

IT’S A TOPIC THAT SEEMS to be all around us. Economists, social activists, researchers, corporate execs, educators, media commentators, labour researchers – all of these have spent the last few years focusing on “precarious work” as an omnipresent reality in each of our communities. That’s also true for my own city, London. Tomorrow morning, at King’s University College, there is a conference on this very issue featuring two noted Canadian economists. You can find out more about it here. The more people attending events such as these, the quicker we’ll start asking ourselves if temporary or precarious work is the kind of future we want in Canada. The future of work itself is increasingly occupying Canadian conversations, but not in the political realm, even…

Hibernating Bigotry

Posted on June 18, 2015

WITH A FEDERAL ELECTION HEATING UP, the political establishment will come after citizens once more, asking them what they want and promising to give it to them if they would but vote. You’d think that after a time, especially following years of political dysfunction, that this being catered to every four years or so would begin to grate on us somewhat. And perhaps it has and that is part of the reason voter turnout continues to decline. But politicians know something about us that they would never say and we would never admit: we aren’t just a people of myriad opinions, but of latent prejudices that we quietly live out each day but which we never let fully out into the open. Thus the…

Growing Through Social Media

Posted on May 28, 2015

MY FRIEND JODI LAUNCHED HER NEW BUSINESS this week and used social media to get the word out (@CityMatchLdn on Twitter). It was exciting to see how quickly word spread and the support she gathered in just a few hours. It caused me to think back to a time only a few years ago when a good number of us quickly coalesced around Facebook and Twitter as our main method of interacting with one another. So much has changed, mostly us. At times communicating through such venues was a rough ride. There were the usual suspects – the haters, the trolls, the overt attention seekers, the underminers, even the political hacks – but for the rest of us there were misunderstandings to be corrected,…

%d bloggers like this: