The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “civilization

The World Economic Summit and Faith

Posted on January 22, 2019

As I compose these thoughts, hundreds of jets are on their way to Davos, Switzerland for the 2019 version of the World Economic Summit.  As always, those in attendance will include capitalist barons, politicians, celebrities, researchers, UN and NGO delegations, and past, present and future national leaders. I write about the summit every year because, well, it is an important opportunity for the moral, anti-poverty, social justice and women’s movement leaders to speak to the elite and weigh in on the side of collective humanity. But in the last two years there is one group that has been asked to partner with the Davos organizers that will come as a surprise to many – faith leaders from around the world. There are some key and sensible…

Summer Reflections – How Did We Get Here?

Posted on July 4, 2018

This year especially, summer couldn’t come soon enough.  And not because we endured a long, hard, unpredictable winter – which we certainly did. No, it’s something more, something almost intangible – a sense that things aren’t great collectively. Individually we might feel a certain sense of normalcy, but when it comes to our position in the broader world – our sense of hope, promise, dignity, respect, the ability to make change – we aren’t as sure where we stand. This week our family has been volunteering at a kid’s autism camp, as we do every year.  You could sense the careful disenchantment, the lack of optimism, the worry over our shared state of affairs in most conversations, coffee shops, and idle chatter.  Much of it was…

Our Frail Craft

Posted on March 8, 2018

Former UN Secretary General Ban ki-Moon once voiced a perceptive observation concerning humanity’s potential and its limitations:   “We are the first generation to be able to end poverty, and the last generation that can take steps to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.” He went on to talk of how future generations will judge us on the strength or weakness of our moral vigor to manage change. And that’s just how it’s playing itself out.  We’ve learned in a previous blog about how the world is making important strides in fighting destitute poverty in the developing world.  Much of this is due to governments rising to the challenge of the UN’s Millennial and Sustainable Development Goals and also for the abilities of…

Is Our World Getting Any Better?

Posted on February 15, 2018

Is the world getting better or worse? It’s a ridiculous question really – not just because it depends on who you ask, but because a single answer proves impossible. The conclusion can only be that it is both. Plenty of research has been published legitimizing both arguments. As a kid growing up in Calgary in the 1950s, both dynamics framed my larger view of the world. It seemed a dangerous planet. The threat of imminent nuclear conflict challenged many of our neighbours to consider constructing bomb shelters. Polio made families insecure. Racism hovered over us as a dark cloud, given what was erupting south of the border. Most nations were anything but democratic and were frequently volatile. The communist threat was everywhere. Sadly, three…

Anatomy of Hatred

Posted on September 1, 2017

Hatred. Neo-Nazis. White Supremacists. Racism. KKK. These terms, and many like them, we had hoped were slowly disappearing from our public life and lexicon, yet they are everywhere in these troubled days. For those individuals and groups who have felt the sheer injustice of such things, however, they have been an ever-present reality. With the events of Charlottesville, we are struggling to grasp the implications of what happens when those most troubling facets of hatred emerge again to prove we never did deal with them effectively. Rallies are being held across the United States and Canada, including London, this weekend that pit the best and worst of human nature against one another. The troubles of recent days have caused me to reflect on the…