The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts tagged “christmas

Christmas On The Ground

Posted on December 24, 2018

Christmas not only endures, but frequently transcends the times in which it finds itself.  In Christian tradition, that first Christmas story should have been over before it started.  A pregnant unwed mother has to travel many miles on a donkey, alongside an obscure carpenter that would soon be her husband.  The great political machine decided it was time to take a census and forced thousands of people back to their home villages to be accounted for. To make it worse, they are poor and there is no place for the mother to have her child, other than a small stable for animals. And yet it worked to an astounding degree – just like all the great inspirational stories over the centuries.  Whether they were real or not ends up…

The Art of Making Goodness Attractive

Posted on December 23, 2018

We aren’t forced into doing good. Nor are we legislated or coerced into performing a kind act for others. Rather, we are inspired into it. It might be a holiday song wafting through a favourite store, a Salvation Army kettle attended by a citizen, seeing our kids start decorating the tree, watching a favourite holiday movie, or standing silent as a family looking over a manger scene in our local park – all of these moments, and so many more, arc us towards kindness, generosity, to be more accepting, even committed to being a more compassionate people. But somewhere along the journey we encounter others who call out the best in us and we end up being better as a result. And whether we…

Christmas and Trust

Posted on December 14, 2018

Living in a more jaded world, where things no longer feel as secure and where the news feels predominately negative, has magnified the loss of trust in our generation.  We see institutions as failing us.  Relationships lie in ruins.  People become undependable.  It leads many to agree with researchers who say that trust is a dying commodity. Except that it’s not. Humanity is still capable of great trust and faith; it’s just that such things become lost in the din of dysfunction. We still count on friends, trust our workmates to get the job done and believe most of those around us will remain with us when tough times descend.  And that goes for our faith in institutions as well.  We count on our banks or credit unions to safely keep and…

On Christmas, Capitalism and Compassion

Posted on December 12, 2018

This past week, we found ourselves transported to the era of Charles Dickens as we attending opening night of the Grand Theatre’s A Christmas Carol.  The inspiration largely came from female lead Jan Alexandra Smith in the role of Ebenezer Scrooge.  In a Canadian first, Scrooge was portrayed by a woman, not in the role of a man, but of a seasoned woman fully capable of transformation.  It was a revelation. The Victorian era found Dickens interpreting a world of great wealth, great poverty and the struggle of these two realities in defining society.  Capitalism was undergoing a rapid rise in production, but was plagued by a kind of emerging poverty Dickens wrote about in his Christmas classic. In this past 50 years, much has been made of Adam…

A December Like No Other

Posted on January 6, 2018

Signs that Christmas 2017 were going to be different began in September when we had three remarkable exploratory meetings. CBC Radio London confirmed for us that they wished to organize a “Sounds of the Season” for December as a way of generating community support for the London Food Bank as well as exploring the issue of poverty in the city. Business Cares – a city-wide initiative that has been running for over years and brings London businesses together in a coordinated effort to raise funds and food for the London Food Bank – held preparation meetings, appointed a working committee, and began working out how the hectic holiday season would look when it came to donation time. The London Food Bank was invited to…

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