The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts from the “The New Internationalism” Category

The World We Want

Posted on November 15, 2018

Over lunch with a civil society leader in our community last week, there was concern expressed over how she feels our Canadian cities are becoming increasingly split over ideologies, never-ending opinions, online mischief and a rampant kind of identity politics.  She asked if I could send her any writings that could give her some hope for a future kind of citizenship that can overcome forces seeking to pull us apart through a rededication to community life.  I sent her the following quotes from Mark Kingwell’s book The World We Want, among others.  Written almost 20 years ago, it remains more relevant than ever and I thought I’d pass them along. “We must trust to listen to the other whom we do not yet know,…

We Won’t Get to the Future if We Can’t Survive the Present

Posted on October 18, 2018

Since the beginning of time people have worried about their future, especially in days of war, transition and rapid change.  But nothing has matched the revolution that technology has introduced and the speed of change is now a light speed.  So, yes, people have a right to be worried. But before we descend too deeply into that madness, perhaps we should be worried about just getting through the present.  We’re not doing well at it.  What’s the source of that information?  Think IKEA. That’s right, a world leading furniture company that annually publishes research reports on how people live in relation to their homes.  If that doesn’t very revolutionary, think again. The most publicized finding of their most recent report involving 22,000 people in 22…

Middle Class vs. Middle Class

Posted on October 4, 2018

It was a report that didn’t get enough coverage yet was fantastic in scope. For the first time in human history, slightly over half of the world’s population is identified as either middle class or richer – over 3.5 billion people.  That leaves a slightly smaller number as vulnerable or poor, but, still, the rapid advancement of the financial status of half the globe serves as a remarkable moment in time. Released last month (September 2018) by the Brookings Institute, it serves as a reminder that much is happening in our world that is good and angles towards hope.  Perhaps more interesting is the speed by which it is all transpiring.  One billion people are being added to the middle class every seven years.…

Trade of Another Kind

Posted on October 2, 2018

One could almost hear the collective sigh of relief when news emerged yesterday of a tentative NAFTA deal between the U.S., Mexico and Canada.  Technically, Donald Trump wants it renamed to the “United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement – or USMC.”   Credit must be given to the negotiators from all three nations who were at it for a year despite obvious hurdles. While citizens, pundits, economists and journalists work diligently to dissect the deal, it is essential to keep in mind that it is taking place in a larger global trading arena that’s in the early stages of transformation.  While the American president seeks to fundamentally alter the world’s trade balance in his favour, other economic players are increasingly cooperating in a fashion that seeks to circumvent…

Sunny Ways? It’s Up To Us

Posted on September 26, 2018

A lot has changed in the three years since Justin Trudeau’s government came to power, promising to deliver on the “sunny ways” he promoted during the campaign.  A few big things got in the way – a court ruling on Trans Mountain pipeline, struggles with the provinces, including the Doug Ford victory, carbon pricing troubles, Maxime Bernier, and, inevitably, Donald Trump – leaving Trudeau’s re-election chances a year from now in the “unsure” category. The promises of a brighter day now seem almost passéin the turmoil of recent years. But maybe not. Gradually, perhaps inevitably, an increasingly number of citizens in this country, America and Europe are casting a cautious eye on all the chaos fulminating from identity politics, an inflammatory social media, hyper-partisanship, and the…

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