The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts from the “Politics” Category

A Woman For All Time

Posted on May 21, 2018

She has this particular day named after her, but so few us know much about Queen Victoria.  Given that this a holiday named after her remarkable identity and reign, that’s just a bit embarrassing. Though she had much to say about the prospects for, and station of, women that would likely infuriate the average feminist of today, her life and accomplishments are virtually unmatched in history.  A woman exercising remarkable power in an age where men primarily dominated every important aspect of life and influence, it’s worthwhile for us to spend a bit of time getting to know her better, this woman whose prominence got most of us the day off. Prior to becoming queen, Victoria faced a difficult upbringing. After losing her father to…

And So It Goes

Posted on May 10, 2018

Over the period of two years, after Canadian Mark Carney left his post as the head of the Bank of Canada to take on the prestigious role as Bank of England governor, it was like he was jumping from the frying pan into the fire. The global economy continued on its roller coaster journey at the same time that global wealth was nesting comfortably within the management of less than 1 per cent of the population. Carney was deemed a typical mild-mannered Canadian who would bring a sense of stability. So when he was asked to speak at England’s prestigious Guild Hall to the country’s elites no one was expecting anything out of the ordinary.. They should have been better prepared. He surprised everyone…

Where Are We Headed Exactly?

Posted on May 8, 2018

Recently I spoke to a group of business leaders on the subject of “wealth and social policy.”  The audience consisted of sincere women and men who had grown concerned that with titanic amounts of wealth being generated in the developed world, little was changing for those whose lives remain in economic stagnation and whose prospect for gainful employment recedes each successive year.  In all of this, governments themselves seemed particularly ineffective. In my city of London, Ontario, recent research revealed that 48% of our workforce is either in precarious or vulnerable work conditions, with little in the way of benefits, pensions, or even a future.  It is a reality that begs the obvious question: if all the wealth is resulting in such little meaningful work,…

“And” or “But”

Posted on May 4, 2018

“If someone isn’t what others want them to be, the others become angry. Everyone seems to have a clear idea of how other people should lead their lives, but none about his or her own.” So wrote Paulo Coelho in his book The Alchemist.  And he’s right – perhaps in this age more than any other, when anger can flash everywhere, even across borders, at the speed of light.  It’s seems like the more we judge others the less we understand life, or history, or most dangerous of all, ourselves. Somehow, we become smaller, the better angels of our nature receding into the dark distance. Yesterday’s post about Senator John McCain was prompted by just such a circumstance.  The person I spoke to felt confident…

A Deeper Code

Posted on May 3, 2018

Senator John McCain’s name came up in a discussion yesterday following mention of what could be one of his final communications before his brain tumour takes its final toll.  The young man’s view was that this is just another self-serving politician who’s lived off the political system for years and it’s time to replace him anyway. When I mentioned McCain’s being a POW in Vietnam, the response was, “Yeah, but think how terrible he was supporting Bush and some of the stupid votes he made.” And so it goes.  We are rapidly losing the ability to place people in some kind of context that truly represents their life and not just the part we disagree with.  That will be the subject of tomorrow’s post, but…

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