The Parallel Parliament

Glen Pearson

Posts from the “Liberalism” Category

Trade of Another Kind

Posted on October 2, 2018

One could almost hear the collective sigh of relief when news emerged yesterday of a tentative NAFTA deal between the U.S., Mexico and Canada.  Technically, Donald Trump wants it renamed to the “United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement – or USMC.”   Credit must be given to the negotiators from all three nations who were at it for a year despite obvious hurdles. While citizens, pundits, economists and journalists work diligently to dissect the deal, it is essential to keep in mind that it is taking place in a larger global trading arena that’s in the early stages of transformation.  While the American president seeks to fundamentally alter the world’s trade balance in his favour, other economic players are increasingly cooperating in a fashion that seeks to circumvent…

Labyrinth

Posted on April 26, 2018

The thing about rage only two decades into the 21stcentury is that it’s everywhere.  In past eras it brewed in turbulent hotspots – the Middle East, India-Pakistan, the Balkans, the Congo, Nicaragua, among others – usually far away and, in consequence, far from our minds.  But the individual and collective anger has spread to normally stable places around the globe – Germany, France, Norway, Britain and most obviously in the United States. In his Meditations, the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius cogently noted, “How much more grievous are the consequences of anger than the causes of it.”  It seems to me that some are coming to terms with this observation.  The “age of rage” has been rolling on for years and the change which that kind…

A Different Path

Posted on March 18, 2018

Fifty years ago  this past week (March 16, 1968), Robert Kennedy announced he would be running for president in the same Senate Caucus Room his brother had made his announcement eight years earlier.  We all know how it ended, but few recognized the personal transformation he went through during that brief campaign. Ironically, RFK chose an opposite path to most of today’s politicians, opting to migrate from a place of attack and negativity to one of hope, social justice and a sense of ethical responsibility.  True, he had frequently been somewhat moralistic earlier in his career, but it always seemed to propel him into attack mode, especially against corruption and greed.  He became his JFK’s watchdog as his attorney general in his relentless pursuit…

Tribes. Tribes. Tribes.

Posted on March 15, 2018

It’s all worked out pretty much as they said – three books that predicted the madness of American politics. Rule and Ruin: The Downfall of Moderation and the Destruction of the Republican Party, by Geoffrey Kabaservice The Party is Over: How Republicans Went Crazy, Democrats Became Useless, and the Middle Class Got Shafted, by Mike Lofgren It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collide With the Politics of Extremism, by Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein It’s interesting to note how long these titles are, almost as if the subject matter is far too great and complex for a simple phrase.  But what’s even more telling is when they were written.  Though they adequately describe the turbulence of American politics today,…

A Moment Gone

Posted on November 22, 2017

It was 54 years ago today that the news emerged from the speaker in my Grade 7 class in Calgary that American president John F. Kennedy had been shot and killed. School was promptly cancelled, leaving us all to head home in a kind of stunned silence, only to see our devastated parents huddled around the television. What we didn’t realize then, as Canadians, was that something more significant passed away than one mere political leader. So much has been written concerning Kennedy’s abilities, flaws and influence that we are left with the impression that his charisma and youth are what shaped his times. They weren’t – impressive as they were. In reality, he had a disastrous first year (Bay of Pigs, his degrading…

%d bloggers like this: