No Need For Persuasion

by Glen

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JUST WHEN YOU THINK NATIONAL POLITICS appears firmly cemented into the realm of hyper-partisan and unimaginative policies comes along a candidate who causes us to think different. Sometimes the effect of such a presence is profound, as I discovered over the holidays reading U. S. Senator Elizabeth Warren’s gritty, A Fighting Chance. The New York Times describes the book as, “a potent mix of memoir and policy,” as indeed it is. Her presence in the political dimension is energizing enough to spend more than one post on her influence. She’s rapidly becoming the most captivating political personality in years.

Yes, Warren is a Democrat, and, yes, she comes from the progressive spectrum. But she is best described as a populist, as seen in the massive movement of middle-class citizens who have found in her practical reasoning and delightful courage a cause for hope. Tired of elitist politics, millions have come to see her as the best choice for president over people like Hillary Clinton or any Republican candidate. And because of that very reality she has become dangerous to the establishment on the Left and Right of the political spectrum.

Put simply, she has successfully launched a new wave involving millions of citizens who are buying into an agenda for political and economic change. It’s important to note that Warren didn’t woo people into such a decision; they were already there, energized and increasingly angry. It’s foolish to think that these people needed convincing and were mere kindling for Warren’s fiery rhetoric.  They lived through a number of decades which saw billions of dollars poured into politics and trillions into a globalized financial system with little to show for it in their own personal progress. So convincing them wasn’t necessary. They are savvy enough to know when the game is fixed, frustrated enough to feel they can’t prevail over an unjust economic order, but just furious enough to stay in the arena and fight back. And Elizabeth Warren has assisted them in understanding their potential for change. Whereas Obama’s early calls for change had been more of a social phenomenon, Warren’s clearly comes from a desire for equity and economic justice.

But the reality is that she has won over so many people specifically because she credits the average person with being smart enough to know something is wrong and human enough to demand change. In drawing a direct link between economic justice and financial reform she has located the sweet spot of middle-class angst.

To give us just a fleeting sense of her outlook, here’s a brief portion of her recent speech to the New Populism Conference last May:

“From tax policy to retirement security, the voices of hard-working groups get drowned out by powerful industries and well-financed front groups. The game is rigged by powerful interests – against the rest of us. If Wall Street can borrow money at 0.75% interest, why can’t we? Our college kids are getting crushed by student loan debt. We need to rebuild our roads and bridges and upgrade our power grids. We need more investment in research. But instead of building a future, this country is bleeding billions of dollars in tax loopholes and subsidies that go to the wealthy and profitable corporations. For big corporations, trade agreement time is like Christmas morning. They can get special gifts they could never pass through Congress out in the public. Because it’s a trade deal, the negotiations are secret and the big corporations can do their work behind closed doors. The game is rigged. The rich and the powerful have lobbyists, and lawyers, and plenty of friends in Congress. Everyone else, not so much. Now we can whine about it. We can whimper. Or we can fight back. Me? I’m fighting back.”

Words like these have been uttered before, but not usually by someone so high up the political ladder and who has effectively galvanized millions of people behind the message. Yes, she’s dangerous – not merely because of her rhetoric, but because of the movement she is assisting to create. Just in time for national elections looming north and south of the 49th parallel has come a voice that counts more on people like us than her own influence. It’s a start. But it’s not the finish.  It might by the early days of the new year, but the old fight continues.